ROYL ICO set to take place


#1

For now I would still call this mostly unconfirmed but there is noise appearing around a potential Royal Wedding ICO, aimed at achieving two goals:

  1. Half of the raised funds will be allocated to three charities chosen by the royal couple
  2. The other half will help Crown and Country Magazine fund a special edition.

The ICO is allegedly started by the Crown and Country Magazine and underwritten by The ICO Rocket: https://www.theicorocket.io/royal-coin/

More news here: https://cryptocoremedia.com/agazine-ico-royal-wedding/


Personal view:

  • Pros:

    • Raising money for 3 notable charities
    • Creating awareness of crypto currencies to a broader audience
    • Positive news for the crypto currency community
    • This might help in creating easier access to buying a wide variety of crypto currencies
    • This might help in users gaining a better understanding on how to trade in crypto currencies
  • Cons:

    • As an ICO I don’t see this coin gaining or retaining any value
    • If appears to be largely geared towards sponsorship of Crown and Country (50% of proceeds) to publish an extra edition (I have no idea how many people care about this magazine)

Conclusion thus far:
I am not against it because the pros still outweigh the cons, would I ever buy into this ICO, not in a million years.


#2

@iwan.spillebeen Iwan, funny enough I would probably get a kick out of participating in this. If they could throw in a free special edition wedding magazine in the deal that would be awesome. And if the tokens could be used on their site for live streamed video on the wedding day or to view exclusive pictures of the happy couple, the guests and what they are wearing, that would be doubly awesome. Maybe the tokens dont increase in value but maybe when royal baby harmeg arrives I get an exclusive look into that too via my tokens? Or even just photos of the royal families at the charity events that my donation went to. Now that I think about it, this could go places…

In all seriousness, in and within it self, this is interesting. I have a lot to learn but is an ico the correct vehicle for this? Could a dapp or crowdfunding alternative be used instead? Also right now the crypto space is small and full of serious developers trying to solve real world problems but what happens when teenage kids start to tear the space up having fun (I am for this) Will regulations be put in place or Vitalik (and others) put a cap on who can do icos or even create tokens? Part of the allure in this space for me is that anything I want to monetize/tokenize can be done by me the common woman with a token that I create. Furthermore any coin like this could be picked up by a developer and made into something more even if it is entirely for fun. Im winking at you dogecoin

Anyway, I am curious about everyones thoughts about if the ability to create tokens will be available to everyone in the future or will this ability become a privledged event in the future? Or will it be a “you have to pay a fee” to even create a token let alone pay a fee to rent space on the blockchain? We like to think about blockchains and our activities around them as infinite but is it really?


#3

I agree that it is absolutely interesting and not against the idea because it adds a positive light on cryptocurrencies (which we all know they desperately need right now), as to your question, no I don’t think they needed an ICO to do this, actually the value of the coin is questionable over time and they could have easily covered this with crowd funding, but again, it is good marketing for the crypto space.

I think this is and hopefully will always remain a core principle of the crypto space, yes someone might launch another doge coin or pizza coin or something silly, but in itself I really don’t have an issue with this (I actually may have a use case for doge coin :P).

I - personally - don’t think this will trigger stricter regulations or a cap, even silly coins provide visibility, public awareness and may push uptake and usage; which is all still desperately needed. If you look at Bitcoin they have about 3.4M active wallets, I reckon Ethereum has around 1.6M; which in the grand scheme of things is still very, very small.

Much to my surprise I was talking to some friends of mine a few days ago (who are in event management) and they had actually never heard of a blockchain and what it does / what it is used for, as a matter of fact they barely knew bitcoin. These are smart people but simply not into technology and therefore barely exposed to cryptocurrency.

I read news / whitepapers / blogs / etc. all the time so I always need to remind myself that most of the public / people I know aren’t actually aware any of this is happening; some have some notion and quite a few have started investing a little after our discussions but to most people this is simply still way to complex a story. Granted, setting up wallets and actually transacting in crypto is nowhere near as straightforward if you’re not into crypto.

I think we are still a long time away from charging to create tokens and nobody will be able to charge for someone creating a new coin. The open source nature of the game and community aspect should prevent that, it would also drastically go against the Satoshi view and whitepaper. What I do think you will see is more paid services emerging around crypto, Hashgraph in an example, and Ripple isn’t that far off. There are also emerging BaaS (blockchain as a service) initiatives which will monetise access; I would expect this to gradually grow.


#4

@iwan.spillebeen If you get your use case up and running, I will buy some Doge in honor of that :slight_smile:

Your friends and my friends should get together. I have been wondering what if all this excitement about crypto is one massive geek fest in the sense that in 20 years from now crypto is so integrated into society that your and my friends still dont know about bitcoin, ethereum, xrp etc, and they dont care? What if crypto to the financial revolution is like cement was to the automotive revolution? Furthermore if the internet revolution was required to bring on the digital value revolution what revolution is dependent on this one? Will I look back in 20 years and cringe that I was super excited about digital cement? Anyway, these are just some random thoughts for today.


#5

Hahaha, careful I’ll hold you to that :stuck_out_tongue:

That is actually likely to happen to a lot of people, I’m sure there were many that couldn’t be bothered about the rise and fall of dot.coms in the late 90s and rightfully so. As a user you don’t really need to concern yourself with how / why it works if it solves a real problem / issue / obstacle for you and you don’t need to concern yourself with market volatility.

It is those of us that are in the space that watch it closely and start building out solid use cases and as early adopters have a real chance of making a name for ourselves in that space (or whatever ambitions we have); the late adopters is what will drive economies of scale, whether we can capitalise on that is in our hands entirely. I welcome them all as pure users in the near future :slight_smile:

I’d be more than happy to state once again that I’d been there at the start and help - in my own way - made the revolution happen.